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No good leader has dreams of becoming a micromanaging boss. However, sometimes even a good leader can slip into micromanaging tendencies.

Why You May Be Micromanaging

If it was an accidental spiral into micromanaging, it could be innocent. Here are a few reasons good leaders find themselves trapped in a micromanagement style.

  • Unconscious Insecurities

If you have underlying insecurities about your leadership adequacy, you may actually be doing damage by overthinking your responsibilities.

  • Bad Hires

Hiring unqualified, immature, inexperienced or unmotivated employees is a drain to everyone on the team, and it can also pull any good leader into the habit of hovering over their workers. This type of boss behavior often leads to micromanaging.

  • Striving for Perfection

No one is perfect. While it’s important to have clear expectations of your employees (and communicate them), it’s unreasonable to expect perfection. By striving for perfection, you will only become frustrated, unmotivated and burned out. These effects can turn you into a micromanager and will negatively impact your team as well.

So, are You Micromanaging? Here’s How to Tell

1) Measuring or monitoring too much.

The advances in technology and available data are amazing. It can help offices be more productive, cut costs, reach more customers, etc. However, tracking too much, just for the sake of tracking, leads to micromanaging and confusion. Instead, focus on what’s most important. Measure one or two things for each project or area of the company and only add to those if absolutely necessary.

Where measurement deals with data, monitoring is concerned with behavior. Another point of confusion is when a manager thinks they are mentoring an employee, but in reality, they are just constantly looking over their shoulder. Step back and give your employees the space to do their work.

2) Gathering too much consensus. When making a decision, it’s important to collect input from employees who will be affected by or involved in that decision. Too much discussion, however, can lead to confusion and things not getting done. To avoid this trap, set a deadline to make decisions. If input isn’t gathered by then, move on! 

3) Intervening too much. Don’t be a “helicopter boss.” Your employees are allowed to make mistakes – then they can learn from those mistakes! A manager who always jumps in doesn’t give their employees the opportunity to learn some valuable lessons and bounce back stronger, smarter and more experienced than before. 

4) Creating too many priorities. Many people, including managers, can fall into a trap of trying to achieve too many tasks or goals that aren’t related. If you set too many priorities that fall on the same level of importance, you only create confusion. Plus, employees become overworked without clear direction.

Looking for More Management Advice?

For more help on being a confident leader for your office, and ditching any trace of micromanaging, visit MS-IL Staffing & Packaging.

To get top-performing job candidates to interview for your open position, you need to write effective and compelling job postings. The quality of your job post will determine what type of candidates apply for your company.

Guide to Writing a Highly Effective Job Posting

  • Use a Strong Job Title

Be sure to use a strong, straight-forward job title. You can also include a brief subtitle that highlights the main responsibilities (up to three) that relate to this position.

  • Include a Compelling Introduction

In your job posting, include an introduction that is similar to a lede in a newspaper article. It should be informative and interesting, making it hard to resist reading more about the open job position. If your introduction is boring, people may think your job or company is also boring.

  • Tell the Company Story

This doesn’t need to be long because it shouldn’t take focus away from the open position. It is effective to include a concise summary of when and why the company started in addition to what the mission of the company is, so the applicants can begin to get aligned with your purpose as well.

  • Sell the Job Position

Not all jobs are exciting, but you need to do your best to communicate the value of your open position. Describe how significant the job is to the company’s success, so the candidate is excited for the opportunity to fulfill these duties and be a part of your company.

  • Give Directions for the Application Process

Since there are various steps depending on the channel of the job posting, this is extremely helpful information. It will also help eliminate unnecessary communication between your office and applicants.

Post Your Jobs & Find the Best Talent for Your Company

For more help on posting your open positions to the best audience for your business, contact MS-IL Staffing & Packaging.

Every manager and human resources professional understands the importance of employee evaluations, but sometimes it can be hard to deal with performance problems.

While it’s a regular part of your job to deal with performance issues, you should still try to minimize poor performance. To maximize performance in the workplace, you should identify the underlying issues that can be associated with poor performance. This way, you can do your best to avoid those issues.

3 Underlying Issues in Poor Performance

  • Unclear Expectations

It’s crucial that all managers communicate clear expectations for their employees. Minimizing confusion will give employees the confidence and direction they need to perform their best. If performance is still subpar, you will know it is not because they didn’t understand the expectations of their job, and then you can move on to identify other issues, or find employment solutions.

  • Untrained Employees

Make sure that you provide thorough training for all your workers. Training should be both hands-on and in the form of booklets or packets, so employees are able to reference training materials after their initial training sessions. You should also encourage an open-door policy when it comes to questions. Employees need to know they are allowed to ask questions or ask for feedback so they can be sure they are doing their job correctly.

  • Work Overload

Whether there aren’t enough hours or people to accomplish the tasks, or the work is being done sloppily, continual overload can negatively affect the quality of work and lead to burnout.

All these reasons for poor performance in the workplace can also lead to greater employee turnover, so it’s important to evaluate whether these issues are something your office needs to address.

Boost Morale & Productivity

To avoid poor performance and employee turnover, contact MS-IL Staffing & Packaging to discuss ways to find stellar employees, create a positive company culture, and increase employee productivity.

Every human resources department or manager has wondered how to make their employees more productive. Some even try to figure out how to make them happy. The truth is, these two questions don’t have to be separate.

Why You Should Invest in Your Employees’ Happiness & How to Do It

In fact, happy employees are productive employees. When your employees are happy, they are motivated and they work harder. To dive a little deeper, here are the main reasons why it’s important to invest in employee satisfaction.

Employee Development & Engagement

Your employees want to know you value their talents, skills, and potential. A company can help boost employee happiness – and even retention – by investing in the professional development of their workers. Bring in educational presentations or workshops, or even consider offering a discount for additional certifications. Your employees will be grateful for the opportunity to improve on their professional skills, and you’ll also receive more skilled, happy workers to help your company succeed.

Encourage Collaboration

Employees are happier in the workplace when they create meaningful relationships with their co-workers. They are not looking for best friends, but they will enjoy their days more when they feel connected to their colleagues.

One informal way to do this is to hold a happy hour every quarter (or more) to allow your workers the chance to get to know one another in a relaxed environment. Getting to know hobbies and establishing connections is a great way to boost employee happiness and morale.

For workplace collaboration, be sure to have regular check-ins with your employees so they always have the chance to speak their mind, brainstorm or ask for feedback. You can choose to have these meetings with an agenda, or be more relaxed, depending on your company culture. Either way, giving your employees a chance to collaborate will help improve their happiness at work and can boost productivity as well.

Happy Employees. High Performance. Low Turnover.

When you do your best to implement practices that invest in your employees’ happiness, you will find productivity among the company increases as well. Another notable change is your employee retention will also increase, making your happy and strong team more successful.

Implement These Practices & Find Greater Success

If you are interested in learning more about how to implement these practices, or how to find valuable employees for your growing team, contact MS-IL Staffing & Packaging.

As a hiring manager, you have a lot of responsibility. One of your biggest responsibilities is making sure you hire valuable and competent workers for your company. A bad hire is expensive, but a star talent can help your company reach their goals faster.

While resumes provide the basic information for each candidate, you’ll need to spend time interviewing your candidates to determine whether they will be a good fit for your company. It’s a crucial time to weed out bad candidates from the ones who should move on for another round of interviews.

If a job candidate does any of these faux pas, consider it a red flag, and move on.

  • No Knowledge of Job Position or Company

It is one of the first rules of applying to or interviewing for a job: The job applicant should do their homework on the company. If you are interviewing a candidate and they aren’t even aware of the job’s responsibilities, or key information about the company, they aren’t interested in working for your company. Even if the applicant has shining experience, if they aren’t dedicated enough to do some basic research to get the job, how dedicated will they be as an employee?

  • Unable to Prove Previous Job Experience

It’s hard to believe that anyone would lie on a resume or cover letter, but unfortunately, it still happens. If during the interview, a candidate can’t provide proof or details on previous employment experience or anecdotal examples, you should end the interview and move on. This is a clear red flag and is a clear reason to consider someone else.

  • Not Willing to Take Responsibility for Shortcomings

Another red flag, though maybe a bit more common, is when an applicant is hesitant or unwilling to take responsibility for any weaknesses or professional shortcomings. No one is perfect and your new hire should own this fact. It’s common to ask about weaknesses or setbacks in the office or professional setting, and if your job candidate cannot answer this question honestly, they might have a hard time with constructive critiques, being a team player, or demonstrating integrity when they work for you.

Find Quality Job Candidates for Your Company

If you need help finding quality candidates for your job openings, contact MS-IL Staffing & Packaging.